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Patricia Domingues M.A.

M.A. Thesis: "Bordering a Place"

Betreuung: Prof. Lothar Brügel, Prof. Ute Eitzenhöfer & Prof. Theo Smeets

Fotos des praktischen Teils der Masterarbeit

Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), Brooch, Arkansas, Green Aventurin, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), Brooch, Resin, Reconstructed Turquoise, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), Brooch, Resin, Green Aventurin, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), Brooch, Resin, Green Aventurin, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013) "Entrench", Brooch, Arkansas, Sodalite, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), Brooch, Arkansas, Sodalite, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), Brooch, Arkansas, Sodalite, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), "So far apart at a first glance, yet diffused and cohabiting", Brooch, Sodalite, Arkansas, Rose Quarz, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), "Escape", Brooch, Arkansas, White Howlita, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), "One element to another", Brooch, Arkansas, Chrysopras, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), "Escape", Brooch, Arkansas, White Howlit, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), Brooch, Reconstructed Material, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), Brooch, Reconstructed Material, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), "Duality 2", Brooch, Reconstructed Material, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), "Duality 1", Brooch, Reconstructed Material, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013) "Monument", Pin, Reconstructed Material, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013) Brooch, Reconstructed Material, Steel
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), "Duality", Necklace, Reconstructed Material, Thread
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), "Duality", Necklace, Reconstructed Material, Thread
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), "Passage", Necklace, Reconstructed Material
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), "On the border", Necklace, Arkansas, Orange Aventurin, Rope
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), Necklace, Sodalite, Arkansas, Thread
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), "Freedom is round", Necklace, Arkansas, Lapislazuli, Rope
Patricia Domingues (M.A 2013), "On the border", Necklace, Arkansas, Orange Aventurin, Rope

Auszug aus dem theoretischen Teil der Masterarbeit

“Every work of art is the child of its time, often it is the mother of our emotions”1
Wassily Kandinsky

    Projects and ideas arise according to the times we cross. They are the fruit, the result of what we see and experiment. We are sensitive beings who spontaneously respond to the period we find our­selves in, the one we belong to.
Ideas, thoughts, expectations and dreams are collectively shared and the “art movements” become our society’s form of expression.
    The theme for my Thesis is, undoubtedly, dedicated to my generation, my era. A time for speculating, reflexion, as well as much protest. A time that should provide dreaming but where the boundaries can be felt. The information we receive in such an overpowering way are liberating and simultaneously desensitizing. Many are those who say our world lacks meaning and that we should live the dream of the perfect society; however we just observe the sinking of Modernism. Human rights are forgotten and disrespected on a daily basis, in several different ways. The link-up of Europe as never been so questioned, and simultaneously so defended through the principles of its genesis. Unions and disunions give a voice to defragmented societies, bare of capabilities to upbear its citizens.
Jewellery, one the most ancient of arts, has always had a profoundly symbolic weight – It is the representative of values and meanings of each community. Many are the historians (jewellery special­ists) who have analysed and discussed the several different reasons that have led the Man to use jewels as an expression: curiosity, desire, the need to adorn and the discovering of the body and consequently, the connection with sensuality and lust, status, power, amongst others. All of these different motives seem to find an answer in human ability to communicate, and jewellery, on this view, has proved and shown to be a powerful strength.
    It represents the perfect bond between creator and bearer, message and recipient. It becomes, as well, an extension of the body and acts as a materializing agent for the connection between intellect and physical.
    Just as in any other epoch, this is a time of disquietude and upheaval. The verses “All I have is a voice. To undo the unfolded lie” (W.H. Auden)2 gain meaning and strength. This disquietude de­termines who I am, and it is from it that my search for answers has come. I have decided to explore and try to understand whether any of the movements or related people bring to life the era which we currently find ourselves in. I have decided to try to understand the importance that Jewellery has been showing as a “Protesting Art”3 and if, there being any intervenients, one can consider the existence of a movement designated as “jewellery protest”. It is certain that art has been coming to develop an extremely important role in regards to what we can call “protesting art”, and it has unveiled and unrav­elled the injustice and issues that live in our current society. But in what concerns Jewellery, the answer is definitely not as clear. One of the purposes of my Thesis is to understand why.
    When talking about Jewellery and protesting, different sides of the matter have to be analysed. About Classic Jewellery we know it has never had the role or duty of protesting, and wearing it dur­ing critical situations could be seen as needless and superfluous. As indisputable as the communicative power of Jewellery may be, and considering that in contemporaneous Jewellery its creators have broken barriers and set standards, the adjectives “superfluous”, “eccentric” and “not important for human sur­vival” can be kept. On an ethical and moral level all these matters are seen as obstacles when analysing the importance of contemporary Jewellery and protesting art.
    Yes, things are what we think and make of them. Jewellery has never been superficial, but man has considered and made it that way. And for this reason for the last 60 years, the contemporaneous jeweller has come to rediscover and create new values for his art. The reflection of the current society is, undoubtedly, one of those values.
Protest Jewellery is a topic that arises many questions: What is a protest? Is a protest a politi­cal act? How can a piece of Jewellery become a protesting piece? Can a work of Jewellery be politics related? Is it that contemporary Jewellery has the duty of touching upon the issues of society? Which is the best way to approach these matters? Which methods have been by our contemporary artists and in which way does their conceptual work approach or reflect these questions?
    In order to get some answers I have split this Thesis in 5 parts: On the first part I will analyse the meaning of Protesting Jewellery and on the second I will refer to the artists that, in my opinion, have touched upon and worked on the matter.
The third part of my Thesis is focused on interviewing the real intervenient artists, inviting them to share their opinion and ideas. Not all of them have agreed with me, and many do not believe to be any sort of protesting in their work. However, this unique experience of looking, studying, and exchanging opinions and experiences, dreams and expectations with this brilliant group of people, has massively enriched my world (Attai Chen; Deborah Rudolph; Deganit Stern Schocken; Kepa Karmona; Nanna Melland; Nicolas Estrada; Shari Pierce; Tanel Veenre; Taweesak Molsawat; Teresa Milheiro).
For the fourth part I will pull out some general conclusions, based on the interviews, about the exist­ence or non-existence of a movement called Jewellery Protest.
    Lastly, in order to deepen the connection between my artistic work and this matter, I would like to analyse the several ways in which this experience, this Thesis has enlightened and enriched my work.


1 Wassily Kandinsky, Russian Painter and theorist. Was born in 1966 in Moscow and died in 1944.He is credited with painting the first purely abstract works. In 1911 wrote the book “Concerning the Spiritual in Art”,which refers to the phrase “Every work of art is the child of its time, often it is the mother of our emotions”
2 Wystan Hugh Auden, poet and essayist. Was born in 1907 in England and died in 1973. Was consider one of the best writers of the 20th century. His work is known for engagement with moral and political issues.
3 Protesting Art, according to Wkipedia, the free encyclopedia, Protest art is” a broad term that refers to creative works that concern or are produced by activists and social movements. There are also contemporary and historical works and currents of thought that can be characterized in this way.” Is not possible define clearly the begining of Protest Art as movement, but all ac­cessible information points to the paint “La guernica, 1937”from Picasso, Spanish painter, as one of the pioneer of protesting art.

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27. Oktober 2014